The re-launching of Chaser News, Part Forty-Five: I was a girl scientist doing strange things in the name of science. I still do the outrageous, but in the name of truth.

When I was a little girl, I was precocious.

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I skipped grades. I was in my high school’s gifted program. I won awards.

I was also very much into science, even as a toddler.

I was a girl scientist and girl inventor, and I did very strange things in the name of science.

I poured orange juice into the television set to see what would happen (it makes a popping sound before it explodes and black smoke comes out of it). That experiment was a failure.

But I had many successes. I took apart the stereo, fixed it, and put it back together working better than before as a kid in grade school with no help.

I still got punished for it, but it went down as a victory in my science journal.

I made little contraptions. Some worked, some really didn’t work, and some really, really did not work as intended.

When I hit university, the nature of my experiments radically changed from basically engineering to psychology.

Experimental psychology opened up a whole new world for me, and suddenly, I found myself doing a very different kind of science.

I still conducted outrageous experiments. At first, to test whatever theories I was learning in my classes, but then when I got a hang of it, I invented my own.

No one ever knew it or figured it out. Not the quiet ones, and not the surreal eccentric ones.

Then came the civil war in the former Yugoslavia, and I decided to put my peculiar talent to good use by conducting experiments as a journalist.

Those were instructive beyond my most optimistic expectations, but sometimes I pushed the limits, like the time I struck up a conversation with a Secret Service Agent when then Vice President Dick Cheney was giving a speech in Toronto to journalists.

I thought someone was going to have to bail my ass out of some sort of secret jail, but the shocked and jittery agent indulged my questions without overt incident.

That is how far I was willing to go to find out the reality of a situation, and my books are empirically solid enough to be used in academia and have been repeatedly.

When I began Chaser News the first time, I upped the outrageous factor of my online experiments, and found out a lot more about people than I had ever expected.

Then when I stopped Chaser, life focussed my energies on far more serious matters, and I had no time or mindset for them.

Until 2018 and then my life was thrown into a place below hell, and then suddenly, those old ideas transmuted and came roaring back with a vengeance.

So I started conducting even more outrageous, but empirically sound experiments. From tweaking noses of social media moderators by creating such a tangle of fine lines to make a spider’s web and see their increasingly angry responses as they have no clue how much I am tweaking their noses just to see how much Big Brother information that have on me as their user (throwing bricks to get jades, kids — and you would be shocked how even dinky little sites have big data on you), to other more subversive experiments, I am gathering data, and the Internet allows it on a global scale, but I am not lying, hacking, cheating, or stealing.

I am just doing something small, subtle, and peculiar.

My latest invention is something I dub mind wild: mix in Mission: Impossible, experimental psychology, culture jamming, Candid camera, military strategy, Spy magazine, and Just for Laughs Gags.

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Chaser is going to be hard news, but by the summer, it will be hard news with a twist. The F.R.E.E.D. will be added to this blend by the fall, and it will not be like anything you have seen before.

It will be scientific. It will find new information.

What it won’t be is the same old way of doing news. While the old ways of academia try to observe, but can never really get it, Chaser jumps into the eye of the storm to do something to turn over every rule to break them.

The girl scientist grew up to be an inventor of an alternative to the way we have been doing journalism, and she is excited…